Personal Brand

Your personal brand concerns how you present yourself to the world—and in particular, to the community in which you are trying to make an impact. Whether your trying to improve your personal career or your company's reputation, this sections provides resources on how to expand your reach and to gain respect. 


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Personal Brand

Brad Feld

I meet a lot of people. I hear a lot of people introduce themselves. I interview a lot of people. Sometimes I want to hear their story; most of the time I don’t. I’ve realized recently that I’m tired of hearing histories. And I’m tired of telling mine. It’s easy to find out most by a simple search on the web. Or a scan through LinkedIn. Or listening to one of the video interviews I’ve done where someone has said “tell me your story.” I was thinking about this especially in the context of any interview. I don’t care where you went to school (I never have). I don’t care what your first job was. I don’t care what happened 15 years ago. I care what you did yesterday, and last month, and last quarter, and last year. That’s probably as deep as I want to go in the first five minutes of our interview. 

 

Mark Suster 

Should you blog? Yes.  As Brian Solis is fond of saying, “PR stands for public relations, not press release.”  That’s right.  In the era of two-way communications people expect an authentic voice and not the Wizard of Oz pulling levels behind the curtains.  Blogging is an important way to build an audience and also drive SEO traffic.  It’s also a great way to build relationships with people interested in your topic area.

 

Mark Suster 

Many of us in the technology, media and VC world sit on panels at lot.  Many of them are painfully boring.  It’s a shame since it’s such a golden opportunity for you to build awareness with your audience for who you are and what you do.  And it’s a surprisingly great way to meet people in this industry who share the stage with you. Here’s my views on how to maximize your time on stage.

 

Mark Suster 

You get so much more out of Twitter when you contribute and become part of the conversation.  If you follow only news sources or famous people like Oprah none of them will likely follow you back so sending your own 140 character Tweet will be a bit like shouting out loud in an empty room.  You need to follow friends and other “real” people in order to become part of a conversation.

 

Mark Suster 

I thought I’d share my views for sitting on a panel (or speaking at a conference): 1. Treat this as an “Earned Media” opportunity; 2. Be honest & straightforward & willing to talk your struggles; 3. Educate; 4. Try not to be boring; 5. Grab all the panelist business cards and follow up with a meeting.